Quote [79] – Historic WWII – Optimisms Loss Of Clarity

Labour’s policy of socialism and peace was a whole which could not be divided into unconnected compartments. ‘You cannot have one policy for foreign affairs and run a policy at home on entirely different principles,’ I said ‘I want us to devote ourselves to making people realise that if they want peace they must have social justice at home’. Connection – Domstic &

International policy

As It Happened – C R Attlee

 

 

 

On President Benes:

“He always seemed to me to be too optimistic and too ready to think his diplomatic skills would get his country through all the dangers which faced it, but he was a good democrat and a good European”

International policy / War As It Happened – C R Attlee
“The threat from the Nazis was already developing, but Benes, as always, displayed great optimism.  He always seemed to me in his dealings both with the Germans and later with the Russians to put far too much confidence in his own cleverness.  He did not seem to realise how long a spoon was needed to sup with the devil.”

 

“No doubt it had many failings, but it was the best Government Spain had had for many years.  We recognised at once that General Franco’s movement  was part of the conspiracy against democracy and most liberals and some Conservatives agreed with us, but, on the whole, the Conservative Party tended to regard Franco as a saviour of society.  In this way they ran true to form, for  hundred years previously they were supporting Don Carlos against the constitutional Government of Queen Christina.” International policy / War As It Happened – C R Attlee
“I also inspected the British contingent of the International Brigade; this was an impressive scene in a Spanish village by torchlight.  The Brigade had saved the Republican cause in Spain.  Serving in its ranks were men of diverse views, but animated with courage, self-sacrifice and devotion, united in the fight for freedom.  It was tragic that all the time the Communists were intriguing and seeking to divert the contest into battle for Communism.

 

“…Whatever arms are required, they must be for League policy and the fist condition for any assent to more arms is that the Government shall be following a League policy … I say most emphatically, speaking on behalf of this party, that we shall never agree to piling up armaments and following a policy either of imperialism or of alliances, but only collective security through the League.”

“I told the house that in my opinion the Government had ‘destroyed the League of Nations as an effective instrument of peace … None of the small States of Europe are going to trust any more in collective security under the League if they know that the League will not stand by them.”

International policy / War As It Happened – C R Attlee

 

When Anthony  Eden and lord Cranborne resigned from the Chamberlain Government early in 1938, as a protest against the Prime Minister’s decision to open conversations with Mussolini whilst Italy was carrying on intervention in Spain and anti-British propaganda, I told the House that the policy of the Government was ‘an abject surrender to the dictators’ and that ‘the government, instead of trying to deal with the causes of war, had always been trying in a feeble way to play off one dictator against another.   That’ is a policy which sooner or later leads to war.’ International policy / War

 

 

As It Happened – C R Attlee

 

 

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